The Natural Resources Defense Council

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(www.nrdc.org). The Natural Resources Defense Council's purpose is to safeguard the Earth: its people, its plants and animals and the natural systems upon which all life depends. NRDC works to restore the integrity of the elements that sustain life—air, land and water—and to defend endangered natural places. NRDC seeks to establish sustainability and good stewardship of the Earth as central ethical imperatives of human society. NRDC strives to protect nature in ways that advance the long-term welfare of present and future generations. NRDC works to foster the fundamental right of all people to have a voice in decisions that effect their environment. Ultimately, NRDC strives to help create a new way of life for mankind, one that can be sustained indefinitely without fouling or depleting the resources that support all life on Earth.

Each year, NRDC identifies 12 BioGems—places throughout the Americas in urgent need of environmental defense.  These unspoiled wildlands are in grave danger from oil and gas drilling, mining, logging and other "development", but they are also placed where citizen activism can turn the tide. 

Among the most egregious projects being planned is Anglo American’s proposal to mine the headwaters of the Bristol Bay drainage in western Alaska for gold and copper, creating a huge open pit mine 2 miles long and 2000 feet deep.  The Iliamna/Bristol Bay drainage is the basis for a large tourism/sports angling industry; Bristol Bay hosts the largest and most important sockeye salmon left in the world.  Anglo American, which has a poor reputation for its environmental destruction through similar projects worldwide, claims that the mine would provide 1000 jobs for Alaskans—failing to mention that it would destroy ten time that many industries in the tourism and fishing industries.  Anglo American has a reputation for such destructive projects worldwide, leaving the indigenous people of the exploited region with no reparation.  Help stop Pebble Mine and preserve the Bristol Bay Fishery.

  Take action for Bristol Bay and 11other Biogem sites by going to www.savebiogems.org

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